When Your Heart Dog Is a Senior

I adopted Boots when he was 2ish and I was 19- his adoption fee was my 20th birthday present to myself. I had grown up with dogs, but had never had one of my own. My childhood dream was always to have a little dog who was constantly by my side- a dog who would sleep in the bed with me and go with me everywhere. By the time I met Boots, that dream had long since been pushed to the back of my mind, but still, I knew he was my dog. The minute I saw him for the first time, I knew.

Since then, we have grown up together in every sense of the word. It’ll be 8 years in July and each one of them has taught us something new. I was a little bit of a wild child when I adopted Boots- I was spreading my wings for the first time as an “adult,” and I can’t say I was the most responsible in my first few leaps from the nest. Boots didn’t make me become responsible- I don’t necessarily believe anyone can make that happen. But what Boots did was love me and show me that I was valuable to him and within our bond. The bond with him changed me.

Boots is inching closer to 11 now, and I’ll be 28 this summer. In a lot of ways, we’ve both slowed down and mellowed out a bit, though in others we’re just as tightly wound as we were back in 2011. Boots’ eyes have the blue haze characteristic of a dog his age, and I’ve begun fielding questions about when Chris and I will start trying to have human babies. Things have changed in big, big ways.

And it’s hard. I can say with 100% certainty that I have never loved another being in the way that I love Boots. I don’t mean that to offend my fiancé or my family or Ranger, though I know that they all understand it. Boots isn’t my “fur baby” and he’s not just my best friend- to describe it more accurately, Boots is more like a piece of my soul who just happens to live outside my body. He’s my Heart Dog.

Last night we had a bonfire and Boots, for the first time in almost 8 years, chose to remain on his blanket inside, watching us out of the sliding glass door instead of coming and sitting outside. He gets tired at the end of walks sometimes these days, and I don’t attempt more than a 3-4 mile hike anymore. He has a dental cleaning coming up and the idea of putting him under anesthesia is terrifying to me, despite knowing it’s what’s best for his long term health. It’s both difficult to recognize and impossible to avoid the knowledge that he is getting older, but I’m trying so hard to make every step of our journey good for him, no matter what. I think that sometimes we can’t let go of not only who our dogs were when they were young, but also, who we were. Neither of us is who we were 8 years ago.

There’s no message to this blog post today- maybe it’s just me shouting into the void or trying to see that I’m not the only one who’s ever made this transition with their Heart Dog. If there is a message, maybe it’s to honor your pup’s dogginess, honor what makes them who they are for their whole lives, not just when they’re young and active. Be there for it all, as they are for us. I think that’s the best thing we can do.

Happy 3rd Gotcha Day, Ranger!

To start, I have to begin the way I always do when talking about Ranger- he’s the second dog I never knew I always wanted. Before him, I did know I wanted a second dog, but it just never worked. Boots and I helped a series of foster dogs find their way to their forever homes, but none of them were the right fit for the two of us. We’d been a pack of two for so long that I just didn’t think we would find a human or a dog who’d fit into our life.

I’m not going to tell me and Chris’s love story today, except to say that it definitely sounds like something out of an implausible and cringeworthy Hallmark movie! But Ranger is 100% the reason our paths crossed, and for that, I will be forever grateful. Just like I was when I stumbled upon Boots, Chris was lonely and needed a best friend when he found Ranger. My mentor and dear friend, Sue, coached Chris through the adoption of a very fearful 5 month old Ranger. His hard work, dedication, and patience on top of the foundation that Sue built are what made Ranger the incredible dog he is today.

Ranger’s shelter intake photo – December 2015

Coincidentally, Chris adopted Ranger right before his 25th birthday- Boots’ adoption fee had been my 20th birthday present to myself 5 years prior! He was terrified at first that Ranger would never come to love or trust him. As a significantly under-socialized stray puppy, Ranger was incredibly afraid of things like going through doorways, walking on leash, being reached for, being in the presence of unknown men, and many other every day things that most people take for granted. I can’t say enough that Chris’s hard work and patience and love made the biggest difference for this big beautiful boy.

One of my absolute favorite shots from our engagement session courtesy of the incredibly talented Carissa & Ben Photography!

There are so many things I love about who Ranger is- he’s so goofy when he’s comfortable! He loves to play with other dogs and he will do his damndest to catch toys in his mouth. We call him our big whale because if he’s feeling lazy, he’ll throw himself forward an inch at a time to be loved on. He’s incredibly gentle, with both people and other animals. He’s learned to be a big boy and express his boundaries, but he always does so with great restraint. The way he handicaps himself to play with Boots, simply laying on the ground and bopping and weaving his big head while Boots jumps up and grabs him by the ears and carries on brings me endless joy- I could not have picked a better little brother for him.

Boots & Ranger on their first walk through our new neighborhood- super ready to be done moving!!

So as February has just come to a close, I celebrate the two amazing gifts I’ve been given by the universe- my fiancé and my second baby. I could not be more grateful for how the two of them have changed me and Boots’ life!